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This Week's Still Life-Batchelder Vase With Bread, Oil, And Garlic


Batchelder Vase With Bread, Oil, And Garlic

Here is the painting from week four of the Tuesday Still Life Class here in Tryon. Everyone's work is improving, and we painters are trying different things each week. The set-ups are getting more complex. It is so good working with a group on a regular basis!

This set-up was a bit different for me. Nowell brought me this vase, and told me it was basically irreplaceable! It is somewhere in the $3,000 price range. That made me nervous! Then I put up some of my homemade bread (ask me for the recipe; it is so easy and pretty darn good). The oil and garlic had strong translucent colored light which is new for me. And the background is a 20x24 painting(?) that was laying around the Tryon Painters And Sculptors studio at TFAC. Sheesh.

I'm excited about the opening of the show at the Asheville Airport tomorrow. It will be up for three months! And I'm really looking forward to getting out and painting the changing Autumn landscape over the weekend. Hope you're doing well there.
 

4 Responses to This Week's Still Life-Batchelder Vase With Bread, Oil, And Garlic

Jimm Brink
via richardchristiannelson.com
I'll take a copy of the recipe... and interested in the painting...

rich nelson
via richardchristiannelson.com
Jimm- Here it is! It's so easy...

Bread: Rich's Version

Newest Version
1. In large bowl, mix together 3 cups bread flour, 1/2 teaspoon yeast, and 1 teaspoon salt. Add 1 1/2 cups of water and mix. Cover with plastic wrap and let sit at least 12 hours.

2. Dump out dough on lightly buttered and floured cookie pan or stone for 2 hours. Sprinkle with kosher salt. Dough will just about double.

3. Preheat oven to 550 degrees with pan of water on bottom rack. Cook for 25 minutes. Take bread off sheet and let cool.

You can substitute up to 1 cup whole wheat flour but no one will eat it. Here's the original recipe and some links. Just google New York Times Bread.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LaODcYSRXU
" target="_new" rel="NOFOLLOW">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LaODcYSRXU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13Ah9ES2yTU
" target="_new" rel="NOFOLLOW">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13Ah9ES2yTU

Older Version

1. In large bowl, mix together 3 cups bread flour, 1/2 teaspoon yeast, and 1 teaspoon salt. Add 1 1/2 cups of water and mix. Cover with plastic wrap and let sit at least 12 hours.

2. Dump out dough on floured board for 2 hours. Dough will just about double.

3. Preheat covered pot in oven at 440 degrees. Dump dough in pot (some need light oil or butter to avoid sticking), sprinkle with kosher salt, and cover and cook for 30 minutes. Then remove lid for and bake for another 20 minutes. Dump out bread and let cool.

You can substitute up to 1 cup whole wheat flour but no one will eat it. Here's the original recipe and some links. Just google New York Times Bread.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LaODcYSRXU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13Ah9ES2yTU

No-Knead Artisan Bread
Adapted from Jim Lahey, Sullivan Street Bakery
Time: About 1 1/2 hours plus 14 to 20 hours' rising

3 cups all-purpose or bread flour, more for dusting
1/4 teaspoon instant (active dry) yeast
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
Cornmeal or wheat bran as needed.

1. In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Add 1 5/8 cups water, and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest at least 12 hours, preferably about 18, at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees.
2. Dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles. Lightly flour a work surface and place dough on it; sprinkle it with a little more flour and fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rest about 15 minutes.
3. Using just enough flour to keep dough from sticking to work surface or to your fingers, gently and quickly shape dough into a ball. Generously coat a cotton towel (not terry cloth) with flour, wheat bran or cornmeal; put dough seam side down on towel and dust with more flour, bran or cornmeal. Cover with another cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours. When it is ready, dough will be more than double in size and will not readily spring back when poked with a finger.
4. At least a half-hour before dough is ready, heat oven to 450 degrees. Put a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in oven as it heats. When dough is ready, carefully remove pot from oven. Slide your hand under towel and turn dough over into pot, seam side up; it may look like a mess, but that is O.K. Shake pan once or twice if dough is unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes. Cover with lid and bake 30 minutes, then remove lid and bake another 15 to 30 minutes, until loaf is beautifully browned. Cool on a rack.


Lois
via richardchristiannelson.com
As always, Rich - stunningly beautiful. I LOVE the blues!

rich nelson
via richardchristiannelson.com
Thanks Lois! I seem to be in a blue phase! Hope you're doing great there...









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